Crabbing & Clamming

Harvest the bounty of Siletz Bay and catch your dinner from the shoreline or unearth it from the mud flats at low tide.

Siletz Bay is a great spot to go crabbing year-round in Lincoln City. The best time to crab is several hours past low tide, ensuring the crabs are active and water currents will cause the least disturbance to your gear.

Essential Crabbing Gear

Items can be purchased in town at the locations listed below.

As the tide goes low in Siletz Bay, mud flats emerge, and within lay a delicious population of clams. Purple varnish and softshell are the chief clams found in Siletz Bay, located in the section of the Bay close to Cutler City. Clams can be found approximately 14 inches below the sand and can be spotted through “shows” or small holes, 1/8 inch in diameter.

Essential Clamming Gear

For adventurers 12 years and older, a Shellfish License is required. For a full breakdown of regulations, visit Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife’s website or call 541-867-4741. Crabbing regulations are also available at the Taft Dock. Each clam digger must have their own container and dig their own clams and may not possess more than one limit of clams while harvesting—except under a Disabled Clam Digging Permit.

Crabbing & Clamming Exploriences

Our Clamming & Crabbing Clinics kick off from June to September and are free to the public. For more information, visit our Clamming & Crabbing Clinic webpage.

Where to Buy a License

Where to Buy Equipment

Safety & Tides

It’s important to be mindful about shellfish safety as you catch or dig up your dinner—always call the Oregon Shellfish Hotline at 503-986-4728 or 800-448-2474 to check on shellfish safety closures. Keep an eye on the tides, practice beach safety and have fun.

More to Explore

instructor leading clinic for tidepools

Tidepool Clinics Learn about the fascinating creatures living in our rocky intertidal pools from local experts at one of our free public tidepool clinics.

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Weather & Tides We enjoy a temperate climate, ranging from 45 to 80 degrees. The Pacific and its winds can be chilly, though, so the key is extra layers.

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