Any Tour should start the day and end it, weather and ocean permitting, with a walk on the beach in Lincoln City. As a special added treat, from the middle of October until Memorial Day each year, Lincoln City places more than 2000 handcrafted glass floats on the beach for the lucky beachcomber to find and keep. For more about that promotion, click here!

Find the Artist Within You

ALDER HOUSE III GLASSBLOWING STUDIO

611 Immonen Road • 541-996-2483 • www.alderhouse.com
When your group visits Alder House III, you will be standing in Oregon’s oldest glassblowing studio. The original facility opened 38 years ago, and the current facility, tucked in a romantic wooded area, opened March 15, 1999. Alder House is open daily at 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., from March 15 to the end of November. At Alder House your group can watch the artists blow glass art pieces or purchase pieces previously created. The artists are happy to share information about their art and techniques and frequently explain what they are doing as they create the pieces. Photography and questions are allowed and encouraged. Located about ¾ (1.21km) of a mile up Immonen Road just south of Lincoln City and a half-mile south of the Siletz Bay Bridge, Alder House III can be reached from anywhere in Lincoln City within 15 or 20 minutes. Admission is free, and a motor coach turn around exists just a short distance up Immonen Road. Groups of 25 or fewer can be accommodated comfortably or larger groups in shifts. Public restrooms are available. Recommended time allotment for your stay is 45-60 minutes.

JENNIFER L. SEARS GLASS ART STUDIO

Handblown Glass Bowl from the Jennifer Sears Glass Art Studio in Lincoln City, OregonSW 48th and Hwy 101 • 541-996-2569 • www.jennifersearsglassart.com
At this glassblowing studio your group will have the opportunity not only to see glassblowing in progress, but also to experience the art. The studio opened in February 2005 and offers glassblowing demonstrations free to the public, Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (summer hours are 7 days a week), exclusive of a few major holidays. In the winter, the studio may close before 6 p.m. Call ahead for reservations if you expect to be there later in the afternoon. The studio is closed for 2 weeks beginning New Years Day.

For a modest fee, the artists at the studio will also teach anyone in your group who wishes to blow their own glass float, make their own paperweight, bowl, or sea creature. The work is ready for them to take home at noon the following day or can be mailed. Photography and questions are allowed and encouraged, and the artists make every effort to educate guests about the various techniques of glass art. Retail sales of glass art are available on the premises and across the street at Volta.

Groups of up to 45 can be accommodated. Public restrooms and visitor information about the area are available, and a wonderful deli across the parking lot at the IGA makes a great inexpensive lunch. You can even eat lunch while you watch glass art being created. If a number of people in your group plan on blowing their own float or making their own paperweight, it is best to call ahead for reservations. In the summer, everyone interested in blowing glass should call ahead for reservations. Recommended time allotment for your stay is 45-60 minutes plus 20-25 minutes for every person in the group who wishes to blow a float or make a paperweight.Glass Fusing Classes on vacation in Lincoln City

MOR ART

4933 SW Hwy 101 • 541-994-2427 • www.morart.net
Both a retail store and a working studio, Mor Art offers something for everyone. It’s just down the block from the Jennifer Sears Glass Studio, on the other side of the North Lincoln County Historical Museum. Mor Art has classes in glass fusion, mosaics or painting on glass. Classes are available for groups or individual students. Whether you make it, buy it, or watch it being made, Mor Art is a fun place to find – or make — your special coastal treasure. There is a modest fee for the classes. Prior reservations are advised. Open hours and days: Tuesday – Sunday 10:00AM to 5:00PM (summer hours will be extended).

JUST THE HIGHLIGHTS

So this trip, you have only a few hours and want to make the most of your time. That means you have to come back to Lincoln City again soon! During your short time here, enjoy these highlights.

TAKE A WALK ON THE BEACH

sandy beach in lincoln city oregon
— Anywhere!
There are more than 17 public beach accesses in Lincoln City. Most areas would be drop off points for a full motor coach. Parking is limited, and only a few have public restrooms. A map depicting beach access points and ammenities is available in our Official Activity Guide. Some beach accesses are more accessible than others, particularly for wheel chair riders. Visit our Accessibility page to make sure you have good information. We have beach-friendly wheel chairs and walkers available for borrowing at Eleanor’s Undertow and the Siletz Bay Lodge. It’s never a good idea for a wheel chair rider to go to the beach without a pal.
Never turn your back on the beach. Sneaker waves can come from nowhere and sweep you into the ocean. Strong currents and cold water make survival risky. And that’s good reason not to walk on the beach after dark as well. Also never climb on the big beach logs. They can roll in the surf and crush you. They look immovable, but they got there with the ocean’s strength. More information on beach safety is available in our Official Activity Guide. Recommended time: Not less than an hour.

SHOP AT TANGER OUTLET STORES

tanger outlets lincoln city oregon
1500 SE East Devils Lake Road • 866-665-8680 • www.tangeroutlet.com
Tanger Outlet has more than 50 discount stores with thousands of valuable items to offer. It is located at SE Hwy 101 and SE E Devils Lake Road, about 10 blocks south of the D-River State Wayside. Public restrooms, motor coach parking, handicap accessibility, and food are available. Recommended time: at least an hour.
Winter Hours — January 02-March 09
Sunday – Thursday 10:00am-6:00pm
Friday – Saturday 10:00am-8:00pm
Regular Hours — March 10-December 30
Monday – Saturday 10:00am-8:00pm
Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm

CHINOOK WINDS CASINO RESORT

chinook winds casino resort
1777 NW 44th • 888-CHINOOK • www.chinookwindscasino.com
The casino is owned and operated by the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and is open 24/7. Chinook Winds has slot machines, keno, black jack, poker, live entertainment, children’s arcade, and several excellent restaurants. Restrooms, handicap accessibility, motor coach parking, and food are available. There’s no admission fee for anything other than the live entertainment.
Recommended time: at least an hour.

JENNIFER L. SEARS GLASS ART STUDIO

SW 48th and Hwy 101 • 541-996-2569 • www.jennifersearsglassart.com
At this glassblowing studio your group will have the opportunity not only to see glassblowing in progress, but also to experience the art. The studio opened in February 2005 and offers glassblowing demonstrations free to glass art in lincoln citythe public, Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (summer hours are 7 days a week), exclusive of a few major holidays. In the winter, the studio may close before 6 p.m. Call ahead for reservations if you expect to be there later in the afternoon. The studio is closed for 2 weeks beginning New Years Day.

For a modest fee, the artists at the studio will also teach anyone in your group who wishes to blow their own glass float, make their own paperweight, bowl, or sea creature. The work is ready for them to take home at noon the following day or can be mailed. Photography and questions are allowed and encouraged, and the artists make every effort to educate guests about the various techniques of glass art.

Groups of up to 45 can be accommodated. Public restrooms and visitor information about the area are available, and a wonderful deli across the parking lot at the IGA bowl of clam chowder lincoln city oregonmakes a great inexpensive lunch. It is best to call ahead for reservations. Recommended time allotment for your stay is 45-60 minutes plus 20-25 minutes for every person in the group who wishes to blow a float or make a paperweight.

MO’S RESTAURANT

If you stop for lunch or dinner at Mo’s, a traditional coastal favorite, you get the benefit of a great view of beautiful Siletz Bay, its wildlife, and maybe even that phantom ghost ship.
860 SW 51st • 541-996-2535 • www.moschowder.com Public restrooms, handicap accessible, food, gift shop, and motor coach parking is available nearby. Hours of operation: Sunday-Thursday 10:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m..

Tax Free Shopping

Lincoln City also boasts a number of specialty stores that add spice to a gift-buying excursion. Many of them can be found in some of the historic districts of town and provide an enjoyable tax-free shopping spree.

At the north end of town, the Lincoln City Plaza and Lighthouse Square Shopping Center, across from each other at the intersection of Logan Road and Highway 101, sport a gourmet coffee house, jewelry, pet supplies, gift shops, beauty supplies & services, groceries, used and new clothing, and a large craft supply house, among other desirable items.

Oceanlake, a neighborhood from North 10th to North 25th on Highway 101, offers the shopper antiques, presents for pets, fine art and books, as well as T-shirts and shells, mineral and gem specimens, kite and garden décor, and much more.

christmas shop lincoln city oregonSeven Gables Shoppes, a block and a half north of the D River Wayside has an amazing array of services that include a local barber and merchandise from handcrafted jewelry to seashells.

In the Delake neighborhood, near the D River State Wayside at the center of town where the lake meets the sea, find kites, beach toys, salt-water taffy and maritime gifts among the fare.

Just south of the D-River Wayside at South Highway 101 and SE East Devils Lake Road is the Tanger Outlet Center, with more than 50 shops selling clothing, shoes, books, and kitchen equipment.

One of the quaintest shopping areas is Nelscott, a small region clustered around the intersection of 101 and South 32nd Street. Christmas ornaments, wine, luscious chocolate, and herbs are a few of the treasures found there.surf shop lincoln city, oregon

If you continue, you can’t miss the Taft neighborhood. There you’ll find art, antiques, “retro” clothing, surfboards and wetsuits, along with a view of harbor seals and other residents of Siletz Bay.

The breadth of merchandise in Lincoln City may surprise you. Those who come for a sandy beach weekend often find they’ve gotten their holiday shopping done, too. You’ll want to set aside at least two hours for each of these regions to give your shopping cells the proper fill. But don’t worry about running out of gas. Each of these areas has a restaurant where you can replenish your energy.

Quiet Communing With Nature

CONNIE HANSEN GARDEN

connie hansen garden
1931 NW 33rd • 541-994-6338 • www.conniehansengarden.com
One place not to miss is the Connie Hansen Garden located on NW 33rd. University of California botanist Connie Hansen created this 1 1/3 acre (.54 hectares) horticultural wonder during the last two decades of her life. Before her death in 1993, visitors from around the world came to enjoy her collection of unusual plants and to study the intricacies of her garden design. Since her death, a cadre of garden angels have continued voluntarily to develop it further and keep it open free of charge to the public. The garden has been featured in Sunset Magazine, The Oregonian, and the “Great Gardens” edition of Fine Gardening.

In the spring, more than 300 rhododendrons and azaleas set the show ablaze. But the garden is so well planned that something is in bloom at all times of the year. You can stroll down the grassy paths to view wonders just two inches tall or towering thirty feet above. And there, among the singing birds and rippling stream, you can pause to enjoy a box lunch, the aromas of nearby flowers, or an informative conversation with the volunteer gardeners.

Guided tours are available by advance reservation. There are public restroom and some handicap availability. Motor Coach drop off and pickup at the parking lot entrance is possible. Admission is free but donations are greatly appreciated. Open daily from sunrise to sunset. Volunteer gardeners are there on Tuesdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., March through November.

REGATTA PARK

regatta park lincoln city oregon
NE 14th Street and West Devils Lake Road

Regatta Park, which fronts Devils Lake on NE 14th, boasts a state-of-the-art playground for the children, as well as a boat launch, walking trails, and an Interpretive Center. And you can’t miss Sparky, The Wish Guardian at the entrance to the park. This site represents the closest, most easily accessible example of mature forest in the Lincoln City area. One 400-year-old tree is more than 200 feet (61 meters) tall and 35 feet (10.67 meters) around at its base. The nature trail is moderately difficult and ½ mile (.8 km) long starting at the north end of the park. Whether or not you elect to walk the trail, the beauty of this area and its voluminous bird life can easily be enjoyed from the picnic tables. Regatta Park is a great place for a picnic. Admission to the park is free. Public restrooms, motor coach parking, and picnic tables are available.  The lower part of the park is handicap accessible.

SPRING LAKE TRAIL

spring lake lincoln city
NE 14th Street and Port

The trail, just a few hundred feet (meters) from Regatta Park, is approximately 2.5 miles (4.02 km) long through a wooded area surrounding beautiful Spring Lake. The terrain is considered moderately difficult, although some of the trail is paved, creating limited handicap accessibility. The parking lot for this area is just north of east 14th on Port. Although the lot can accommodate a shuttle bus, it would not accommodate a full motor coach. With a full coach, only pickup and drop off would be possible. Admission is free.

SILETZ BAY INTERPRETIVE KIOSK

SW 51st Street and Hwy 101

Just south of SW 51st Street on the ocean side of Highway 101 is the Siletz Bay Park, with an interpretive kiosk and picnic tables. The area offers a stunning view of Siletz Bay and its variety of bird species and other wildlife. The interpretive kiosk provides information about the wildlife in the Bay and the history of the Bay. It is admission free, handicap accessible, and has restrooms. The parking lot is small and would not be appropriate for a full motor coach, although smaller shuttle transportation could be accommodated.

DISCOVER YOUR CULINARY SIDE

THE CULINARY CENTER IN LINCOLN CITY

oysters on the halfshell
801 SW Hwy 101, 4th floor North • 800-452-2151 • www.oregoncoast.org
The Culinary Center focuses on the abundant foods and culinary heritage of the Pacific Northwest. Good, safe and wholesome foods locally grown, seasonally fresh and whole (or minimally processed) are not only more pleasurable to eat and prepare, but also minimize the negative impact on the environment. The Center is committed to teaching time-tested methods and skills, with special attention to strengthening the connections between farmers, fishermen, other producers and the consumer.

The program includes cooking classes and demonstrations for individuals and groups with respect to all kinds of cuisine, not just Pacific Northwest. It includes a variety of invited chefs from other areas, regions and countries to deepen the value of the program.

Call Chef Sharon Wiest at 541-557-1125 or check our website to see what classes are offered during your stay in Lincoln City. Planning for a group, corporate party, bus tour, wedding or family reunion? We can arrange a class just for you! But call ahead. Regular classes nearly always sell out, and groups must be arranged around the regular classes.

CRABBING ON THE BAY ON SW 51st Street

dungeness crab in lincoln city
Crabbing and clamming are great ocean activities for any group. Although crabbing is done commercially in the ocean, primarily during the winter, those seeking only a few can pursue them at any time of the year—and you do not have to get on the ocean to do it. Siletz Bay and Siletz River at the south edge of Lincoln City are prime spots for crabbing. The best time of day is an hour or two before or after low tide when the creatures are active and water currents disturb the crab gear least. All you need is a crab ring net, bait, license, and a measuring gauge, all of which can be obtained from Eleanor’s Undertow on SW 51st Street or Ace Hardware at S 101 and 49th. Regulations for crabbing are posted on the Taft Dock on SW 51st Street, next to Mo’s. Crabbing and clamming classes are taught in the spring, summer, and fall. For more information on how to do it yourself, please visit our “Catch Your Dinner” webpage!

CLAMMING ANYWHERE ON THE BEACH OR IN THE BAY

purple varnish clams siletz bay
Clamming is as simple as crabbing and equally satisfying. Most of the clams found in this area are either the smaller purple varnish clams or larger soft shell clams. Low tide is when you dig for clams. Look for soft shell clams in the mud flats on either side of the bay in the upper bay between Drift Creek and the Millport Slough. A round shaped show (or hole) identifies the clam located up to 18” below the surface.

Purple varnish clams are the dominate clam in the bay. They are located in the lower portion of the bay from Cutler City to near the entrance of the bay. The clams are located to depths of 14” below the surface of the sand and are identified by numerous shows approximately 1/8” in diameter. Clamming also requires a license.

Both of these activities can be enjoyed before or after your culinary lesson. The most important thing is making certain your group has accommodations with a kitchen so you can enjoy your catch as you try out your newly acquired skills. For more information on how to do it yourself, please visit our “Catch Your Dinner” webpage!

WILDLIFE VIEWING

HARBOR SEALS, BROWN PELICANS, GULLS, SANDERLINGS, AND EAGLES

Brown Pelican
Siletz Bay • SW 51st Street

As many as 150 harbor seals frequently can be seen sunning themselves on the Salishan spit in Siletz Bay on SW 51st Street. These mammals, reaching six feet (1.83 m) in length and 250 pounds (113.4 kilograms), dive as deeply as 60 feet (18.3 m) and stay under water an average of five minutes. If you see their pups lying on the beach, leave them alone. Their mothers frequently leave them for hours, even overnight, while hunting for food. If you touch the pups, the mothers will not return to them, and they will likely die.

Brown pelicans are one of six endangered species in the area. They inhabit the area from late spring through early fall after breeding in California and Mexico. Residents and visitors alike enjoy their fishing antics in Siletz Bay and on the ocean. They are noticeable for their rag-tag formations and their habit of folding their wings and collapsing into the water to catch prey.

Adorable flocks of sanderlings and sandpipers race along the beach, just ahead or behind the tide line, to catch their crustacean dinners, while large groups of seagulls swoop in to steal their meals from beached fish or even unsuspecting humans with lunch. There are a variety of kinds in the area.

You can watch wildlife in Siletz Bay as little or as long as you wish. Your only cost might be $.50 for the viewing scope if you forget your binoculars. Restaurants, handicap access, motor coach parking and food are all readily available in the area.

DEVILS LAKE

kayaks devils lake
North Hwy 101 and West Devils Lake Road

On the northeast side of Lincoln City, 680-acre (275 hectares) Devils Lake offers a lake view and short forest trails with easy access and abundant parking. The lake and forests should reveal at least two-dozen bird species with more possible depending on the time of year and your luck.

Devils Lake is also home to several thousand Chinese grass carp, many the size of miniature poodles. Schools of grass carp are easily seen at Blue Heron Landing, 4006 W. Devils Lake Road. Except for the possibility of needing to buy the binoculars you left at home, the only expense you might incur watching wildlife on Devils Lake is the “boat rental fees” for your group to take a pontoon ride or kayak trip on the lake. These are available at Blue Heron Landing.

WHALES

gray whale oregon coast
You can see them from anywhere.

Of course the largest mammals around are the whales. The grays are the most commonly seen, though pods of orcas also travel through on occasion. Gray whales were removed from the endangered species list in 1994 and are best seen during their migration period from mid-November through mid-May. To view them easily, travel to an elevated place like Cascade Head, SW 40th Street, Roads End, or the upper floor of an oceanfront motel. They are most frequently seen during periods of migration in late December, mid-March, and early May, although about 200 of them live in the area year-round and are spotted almost daily. During some days of the last part of December and the last part of March, trained volunteers are stationed all along the coast to help folks see and learn about whales and the migration.

If you wish to take an ocean whale-watching voyage, there are several chartergreat blue heron boat companies in Depoe Bay, just eight miles (12.87 km) south of Lincoln City, which can take you on an hour-long trip for a nominal fee. Total time round trip from Lincoln City is less than two hours.

OTTERS & BIRDS

On the lakes and rivers of the area other varieties of wildlife may be present. Although Pacific sea otters were hunted to extinction here early in the last century, freshwater otters, reaching nearly three feet in length, still cavort in inlets and streams. Some are even occasionally seen on Devils Lake. Devils Lake also boasts colorful perching wood ducks, coots, loons and, of course, the Great Blue Heron. The stately bird, which may be found also in Siletz Bay, is approximately four feet (1.22 m) tall at maturity. If you are lucky, you might even catch a glimpse of its elaborate and graceful mating dance.

ROOSEVELT ELK

Hwy 101 at the north end of Lincoln City.elk-birds

Perhaps the largest mammal in the area, other than whales, is the Roosevelt Elk, reaching one thousand pounds (453.59 kilograms). They travel in large herds in the meadows around the Salmon River Estuary and Chinook Winds Casino Golf Resort, going down to the edge of Devils Lake for water. The elk are most visible during the winter months. In order to find food and water, elk and deer often need to cross Highway 101, so be alert and cautious when driving.

WILDLIFE WATCHING GUIDES ARE AVAILABLE

The Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau has bird and other wildlife watching guides for self-guided tours, featuring the best vantage points for viewing and photographing marine mammals and birds without harming the environment. For a complete list of guides, click here.

History Buff Tour

Lincoln City has several highlights for history buffs.

PIONEER CEMETERY

Many folks have felt the presence of spirits at the Pioneer Cemetery. It is on the inland side of Highway 101, just across the road from the Inn at Spanish Head in the 4000 block of south Highway 101. Even if you don’t feel the presence, the view is stunning and the gravestones interesting. Allow at least 30 minutes. No restrooms. Parking is available at the site. The road is extremely narrow and steep. Be particularly cautious if in a motor coach. Admission is free.

NORTH LINCOLN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM

north lincoln historical museum
For those who love history or just “old stuff”, the North Lincoln County Historical Museum is a real treat. The downstairs exhibit gallery includes: displays on Native American history with examples of baskets and beadwork; early settlement and homesteading displays that show early tools and household items; and dairy, fishing, and cannery displays with artifacts from those industries. The upstairs gallery focuses on tourism, celebrating the age of the automobile with information on the first cars and roads to the area. Roadside attractions, early tourism promotions like the notorious “Redhead Roundup”, and one-of-a-kind businesses like the Pixie Kitchen are also exhibited. A hands-on children’s corner will keep younger children entertained while their parents tour the museum. The museum is located in the historic Taft district of Lincoln City at 4907 SW Highway 101. Hours are noon to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. Admission is free, thanks to a grant from the City of Lincoln City. Donations are appreciated. Public restroom, handicap access, and motor coach parking is available on the street.

DRIFT CREEK COVERED BRIDGE

drift creek covered bridge
South Bear Creek Road, 1 mile (1.61 km) south of Hwy 18

Covered bridges have always been of historic and photographic interest in Oregon. One of Oregon’s oldest, the Drift Creek Covered Bridge, was originally constructed in 1914 on Drift Creek just south and east of Lincoln City, Oregon. Laura and Kerry Sweitz saved it from destruction in 2001.

The Sweitzes gave the bridge and the land upon which it rests to Lincoln County and embraced with open arms the opportunity to share it with visitors 365 days a year. It now stands as a memorial to its pioneer builders, from both this century and last, and is a unique and serene place for visitors to enjoy.
For all they have given, the Sweitzes, who live only a few yards from the bridge, ask in return only that visitors respect their privacy and their need for quiet. To get there, travel east of Lincoln City, OR, on Highway 18. Approximately 3.5 miles (5.63 km) east of the Otis Café turn south on North Bear Creek Road. Proceed about one mile (1.61 km). The Bridge is on the left. Enjoy it for a picnic, a photo expedition, or just for its simple wonder and the tale it tells of generosity and the human spirit.

Restrooms, a picnic area, and small coach parking is available. The Site is handicap accessible. Allow at least two hours to travel and enjoy this bridge. Don’t forget your camera. Admission is free.

SILETZ BAY INTERPRETIVE KIOSK

siletz bay aerial
SW 51st Street and Hwy 101

Just south of SW 51st Street on the ocean side of the highway is the Siletz Bay Park, with an interpretive kiosk and picnic tables. The area offers a stunning view of Siletz Bay and its variety of bird species and other wildlife. The interpretive kiosk provides information about the wildlife in the Bay and the history of the Bay. It is admission free, handicap accessible, and has restrooms. The parking lot is small and would not be appropriate for a full motor coach, although smaller shuttle transportation could be accommodated. Allow 30 minutes to an hour.

ANTIQUING

Throughout town.

antique booksFor more than a decade Lincoln City has been the place to go on the Coast if you are interested in antiques and collectibles. With a variety of stores, the largest antique mall on the Oregon Coast, and over 80 dealers, Lincoln City usually has that specialty item for which you have long been searching.

To celebrate the quality of “antiquing” every February Lincoln City hosts Antique Week, a ten-day long event. Antique Week features city-wide antique store sales, exhibits, an appraise-a-thon, and special antique glass float drops.

For a map and list of Lincoln City’s antique stores, contact the Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau at 800-452-2151. This tour is free until you find that item you just can’t live without.

JUST ADD WATER

SURF’S UP

surfing oregon coast
Roads End and Nelscott Areas
Lincoln City has ten miles (16 km) of steady waves from Roads End at the north to Salishan at the south. Those swells encounter rocky reefs offshore, piling the water into mammoth waves just waiting for the rider. A popular spot is Roads End State Park. And if you need equipment or instruction, help is a short distance away at the Oregon Surf Shop, the Lincoln City Surf Shop, or Safari Town Surf Shop. In the winter months, the Nelscott area is known for its “Hawaii-like” swells intended only for the experts. Motor coach access and restrooms are available only at Roads End State Park. There are restrooms and hot showers at Canyon Drive Park in Nelscott. Recommended time: as long as the surf’s up.

LAKE SPORTS

Devils Lake, northeast side of Lincoln City

The 680-acre (275 hectares) lake is a popular spot for water skiers and jet skiers, particularly from Memorial Day through September when the weather is calmer and the lake is warmer. A pontoon, motorboats, kayaks and canoes can be rented at Blue Heron Landing, 4006 W. Devils Lake Road, 541-994-4708. Safari Town Surf Shop also has rentals for fun on the lake – check them out here: safaritownsurf.com.

RIVER SPORTS

The Salmon River to the north, Siletz Bay and the Siletz River to the south provide quieter water activities. On those waters you can take a swim or enjoy a peaceful kayak or canoe trip or a stand up paddleboard experience. Kayaks for the rivers and Bay may be rented from Safari Town Surf Shop.

Motor coach parking, restrooms, and food are available at Siletz Bay and Devils Lake. Recommended time for any of these activities is not less than two hours.

HAUNTED TOUR

GHOSTS, SPIRITS, AND LEGENDS IN THE LINCOLN CITY AREA

It seems that spirits love Lincoln City as much as humans do— perhaps because of the rich coastal history, a variety of Native American sacred places, or simply the intense emotion of sea tragedies and storms. If you enjoy seeking out phantoms, you can take your own Eeeeeeko Tour. This tour can be self-guided for your group, or with advance notice the Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau may be able to arrange step-on service. Call 800-452-2151 to arrange step-on service. 30 days notice is appreciated.

BREAKFAST WITH “MATILDA”

The Wildflower Grill at 4250 NE Hwy 101 has its own resident benevolent spirit, a woman they call Matilda. Although Matilda most frequently makes her presence known by opening and closing cabinets, she has made other, more personal contacts as well. On one occasion she rattled the locked doorknob of the employee restroom. When she didn’t get a response as immediate as she wished for, Matilda simply pushed the door open without unlocking it. But she refused to make herself visible to the occupant. One of the owners has, however, seen Matilda, who walked past him in the restaurant and simply disappeared on its balcony. Maybe Matilda stays because the breakfasts at Wildflower are unbeatable. This is a great place to start your day and your tour off right! Public restrooms are available. Motor coach parking is possible at the curb. Allow an hour for breakfast. Breakfast isn’t free, but waiting to see if Matilda shows up while you eat breakfast is.

PIONEER CEMETERY

Many folks have felt the presence of spirits at the Pioneer Cemetery. It is on the inland side of Highway 101, just across the road from the Inn at Spanish Head in the 4000 block of south Highway 101. Even if you don’t feel the presence, the view is stunning and the gravestones interesting. Allow at least 30 minutes. No restrooms. Parking is available at the site. The road is narrow and steep. Caution is advised, particularly with a motor coach. Admission is free.

NORTH LINCOLN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM

More than one spirit frequents the North Lincoln County Historical Museum at 4907 SW Hwy 101. The former curator frequently heard “human” noises traveling about from room to room and felt the benevolent presence of someone, even though no other humans were in the building. Psychics have felt the presence of a group that occasionally meets around the conference room table on the second floor.

For those who love history or just “old stuff”, the North Lincoln County Historical Museum is a real treat. The downstairs exhibit gallery includes: displays on Native American history with examples of baskets and beadwork; early settlement and homesteading displays that show early tools and household items; and dairy, fishing, and cannery displays with artifacts from those industries. The upstairs gallery focuses on tourism, celebrating the age of the automobile with information on the first cars and roads to the area. Roadside attractions, early tourism promotions like the notorious “Redhead Roundup”, and one-of-a-kind businesses like the Pixie Kitchen are also exhibited. A hands-on children’s corner will keep younger children entertained while their parents tour the museum. The museum is located in the historic Taft district of Lincoln City at 4907 SW Hwy 101. Hours are noon to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. Admission is free thanks to a grant from the City of Lincoln City. Donations are appreciated. Public restrooms, handicap access, and motor coach parking is available on the street.

SILETZ BAY SCHOONER

Some 150 years ago a sailing vessel washed up in Siletz Bay at the south end of Lincoln City, just two blocks south of the Museum on SW 51st Street. Seen as recently as 10 years ago, the vessel, likely a schooner or a brig, has been buried in the mudflats of the bay, which was a working harbor in the early part of the 19th century. That vessel may be the source of a ghost ship, which has occasionally been seen sailing into the bay, though not on the water, and then vanishing into thin air. A bay area resident saw the phantom ship as recently as 2001 as it sped full-sail toward her living room window. Siletz Bay is a good place to view wildlife, stroll on the beach, and take photographs, so allow 30-60 minutes for your stay there. Public restrooms and motor coach parking is available. Some areas are handicap accessible.

LUNCH:

While you are on Siletz Bay, there are three good opportunities for lunch: Mo’s Restaurant, Tiki’s, and Eleanor’s Undertow. All are near the the turnaround on SW 51st Street.

SPOUTING HORN IN DEPOE BAY

A more restless ghost spends his time near the bar in the Spouting Horn Restaurant in Depoe Bay, just 8 miles (12.87 km) south of Lincoln City. His appearances were so frequent that children of the owners and employees finally dubbed him Ralph to give him a more familiar identity. In the mid-eighties he appeared in a cook’s apron, arms crossed, and staring as if to suggest the humans he encountered were intruding on his territory. He frequently crosses the hallway to the dining room or streaks across the restaurant when only owners or employees are present. Public restrooms, and coach parking are available. Allow at least 30 minutes to have afternoon dessert and chat with the staff about Ralph. You’ll need to pay for your dessert but not for a sighting of Ralph.

GHOSTS “NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC”

A few haunted sites in Lincoln City cannot be visited by the general public. In a private home in the Roads End area, a young girl, seen only from the waist down, occasionally cooks breakfast for her father. Jealous of the current owners’ grandchildren, the girl regularly turns the children’s pictures to face the wall. She is believed to be the daughter of a man who worked in the area until the early hours of the morning and later shot himself while standing at the edge of Cascade Head.

The Devils Lake Fire Station in north Lincoln City houses the spirit of a former volunteer firefighter who makes as his home the first fire truck put into service at the station that is kept in the back bay. The bay area is always cold, even when the weather is hot and the doors are closed. A few of the volunteers have heard him walking up and down the stairs during the night, and one of the volunteers found him napping on the break room couch. But he vanished in an instant. Some of today’s volunteers believe that “Bob” still rides along with them to fires.

THE LEGEND OF DEVILS LAKE

Spirit? Monster? Devil? No one knows for sure. But as legend has it, a long-tentacled creature inhabits the 680-acre (275 hectares) fresh water lake on the northeast side of Lincoln City. The lake, formed by sand dunes and beach deposits which blocked the lower end of the valley 14,000 years ago, empties into the ocean through the D River. At 120 feet long, it is reported to be the shortest river in the world. Centuries ago, when it was known as Indian Bay, many Siletz Indians vanished into its waters when they were pulled from their vessels by giant tentacles. On one particular occasion, so the legend goes, a Chief sent warriors across the waters in an effort to win a maiden from the warrior of her choice. The waters boiled, and giant tentacles wrapped around the warriors and pulled them from their canoes. In an effort to pacify the devil, feasts were regularly held on the shores of the lake and sacrifices were offered to the Lake Devil, whose hideous head rose high above the surface.

HAVEN’T GOTTEN ENOUGH?

For more information on ghosts and legends, consult the Pioneer History of North Lincoln County found at the North Lincoln County Historical Museum or A Haunted Tour Guide to the Pacific Northwest by Jefferson Davis.

ESPECIALLY FOR KIDS

REGATTA PARK

NE 14th Street and West Devils Lake Road
Regatta Park, which fronts Devils Lake on NE 14th boasts a state-of-the-art playground for the children, as well as a boat launch, walking trails, and an Interpretive Center. This site represents the closest, most easily accessible example of mature forest in the Lincoln City area. One 400-year-old tree is more than 200 feet tall and 35 feet around at its base. The nature trail is moderately difficult and starts at the north end of the park. Whether or not you elect to walk the trail, the beauty of this area and its voluminous bird life can easily be enjoyed from the picnic tables. Regatta Park is a great place for a picnic. Admission to the park is free. Public restrooms, motor coach parking, handicap access, and picnic tables are available.

ON THE BEACH

Tide pooling at Roads End or NW 40th, combing the beach for agates and shells, hunting for glass floats, especially from mid-October through Memorial Day each year.

DEVILS LAKE

Northeast side of Lincoln City
The 680-acre (275 hectares) lake is a popular spot for water skiers and jet skiers, particularly from Memorial Day through September when the weather is calmer and the lake is warmer. Other water activities include hydrobikes, swimming, fishing, a pontoon, motorboats, kayaks and canoes, all of which can be rented at Blue Heron Landing, 4006 W. Devils Lake Road, 541-994-4708.

MOVIES

For those who want to sit quietly and be entertained, there is always a good movie showing at the Bijou Theatre in the Oceanlake District or Lincoln City Cinemas Six on South Hwy 101.

MINIATURE GOLF, Bowling & batting cages

For the more energetic group that needs a bit of wearing out before bed, several locations offer a variety of activities. All American Putt-N-Bat at 1255 NW Hwy 101 has miniature golf, video games and slow and fast-pitch batting cages. And if that does not destroy your confidence enough, let that 12-year-old take you on for a line or two at Delake Bowl just south of the D-River Wayside. Or you can always take the kids to swim at the Community Center pool, east of Hwy 101 and just south of NW 22nd Street.

ARCADES

1. CHINOOK WINDS CASINO RESORT
 1777 NW 44TH • 888-CHINOOK • www.chinookwindsgaming.com 
Chinook Winds has a variety of arcade games to choose from and monitored childcare to protect your child while you all take a break.
2. ELEANOR’S UNDERTOW 
869 SW 51st • 541-996-3800 
Eleanor’s, famous for ice cream and hotdogs, has a kids game room and a great view of Siletz Bay.
3. GAME OVER ARCADE 2821 NW Highway 101 • 541-614-1150 Whether you are into pinball machines, classic arcades, or the latest and greatest… there’s a little something for everyone. Hours of fun for the whole family!

SKATEBOARDING

Lincoln City has a spectacular skateboard park named one of the “gnarliest” parks in the United States. The 8,000 square-foot (743 square meters) facility in Kirtsis Park has more than 100 lines and a unique 9-foot (2.74 m) bowl to challenge boarders of all levels. A second park, only a short distance from the first, is covered to facilitate boarding in inclement weather. The new park, the Cradle, is 8600 square feet (799 square meters) with 5600 square feet (520 square meters) under a roof. Part of the park is dome shaped, called a cradle, and allows the boarder to skate upside down if his/her speed is sufficient. There are only 3 such cradles in the world. Restrooms, and small shuttle parking are available. Admission is free—and at your own risk.

GREAT FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

For our current calendar of events, please click here. See a list of annual events below. Dates are subject to change, so please be sure to confirm dates before making travel arrangements.

JANUARY OR FEBRUARY

JAMBALAYA COOK-OFF:

To celebrate Mardi Gras come taste the best Jambalaya Lincoln City has to offer. Held in the Culinary Center in Lincoln City, this event offers a live cooking competition, Jambalaya samples and a people’s choice award. A panel of judges will decide which is the most authentic dish, and one lucky NW Chef will claim first place! Visit the Jambalaya Cook-Off website!

FEBRUARY

ANTIQUE WEEK:

Each year, in early February, Lincoln City celebrates antiquing during a 10-day long festival that includes activities like antique sales, appraise-a-thons, exhibits, workshops, antique celebrity appearances, and other good fun. Activities vary yearly. For a list of antique stores in Lincoln City, click here. Visit the Antique Week website!

March

SPRING BREAK IN LINCOLN CITY:

Featuring Oregon Made Films Festival, glass float promotions and more!

FESTIVAL OF ILLUSIONS:

Lincoln City is magic during Spring Break! Enjoy nights of live magic performances and trickery, with each evening featuring a different professional magician or illusionist. Sign up for Magic Camp where you can learn tips and secrets from the pros.

April

GREAT OREGON COAST GARAGE SALE:

More than 100 individual and organizational garage sales occur on the same weekend and are combined with “in sidewalk” sales throughout the Lincoln City area to give everyone a whole shopping experience.

The sales are listed in a guide indicating dates, times, locations and directions. The guide is free at motels, some businesses, and other strategic locations in the City, including the Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce 4039 NW Logan Road. Shop the coast to look for “the other man’s gold.” This one is free until you find the items you just can’t walk away from. Allow at least a day to catch the sales most appealing to you—two days is even better.

LINCOLN CITY COMMUNITY DAYS:

This event is a celebration of our community, and we invite you to join us! Events include a pub-crawl, pancake breakfast, Mud-Flat golf tournament, Earth Day Celebrations, and more! Visit www.lincolncitycommunitydays.blogspot.com for a list of activities.

LEARNING FEAST:

Lincoln City’s Learning Feast is a two-week program featuring an interesting collection of classes and seminars where you can come to Lincoln City and learn something new.

MAY

FISH TACO COOK-OFF:

Lincoln City celebrates Cinco de Mayo at the Fish Taco Cook-off in the Culinary Center in Lincoln City. Included are a live cooking competition, fish taco samples, and a people’s choice award. During our “Iron Chef” competition a panel of judges will decide which NW Chef deserves to claim first place for the “Best” fish tacos.

JUNE

MUTT MASTERS DOG SHOW & OLYMPICS:

Lincoln City hosts Mutt Masters at the old Taft Elementary School, located at 1545 SE 50th Street. It’s a day of exciting competitions, including physical sports, fun show categories and pure breed events. Pre-registration is recommended and limited by category. For humans there will be booths with pet information, gifts, and activities for the kids. Bring the whole family, even if you leave your mutt at home.

SUMMER KITE FESTIVAL:

To round out spring and send you smiling into summer, the fourth weekend in June brings the first of three annual Kite Festivals, the Summer Kite Festival at the D-River Wayside. Here experts and novices alike fly hundreds of colorful and uniquely-shaped kites, from fierce dragons, to enormous cuddly bears. The festival offers kite-making workshops, contests, demonstrations, and “beach food.” Admission is free. Motor coach drop off available, handicap accessible, public restrooms.

JULY

FIREWORKS:

Come celebrate Independence Day at the firework display located in the Historic Taft District overlooking the Siletz Bay. Fireworks start at dusk.

AUGUST

SAND CASTLE CONTEST:

As an added beach activity, the Bay Area Merchants Association sponsors the annual Sandcastle Building Competition on Siletz Bay on SW 51st Street. There you can eat more beach food and build the castle of your dreams. Public restrooms, food, handicap accessibility, motor coach parking nearby. Admission is free.

SEPTEMBER

OREGON COAST PRIDE FESTIVAL:

To show our support for diversity, Lincoln City celebrates its annual gay pride festival in mid-September. This colorful citywide themed event includes, live music, Flamingo Bingo, kid’s activities, camel rides on the beach, and a street fair on SW 51st Street in the Historic Taft District with live performances and so much more! Visit their website here!

CELEBRATION OF HONOR:

The Celebration of Honor is a community-wide veteran appreciation weekend sponsored primarily by Chinook Winds Casino Resort. Lincoln City Mayor Hollingsworth declared the 4th weekend of September to be a celebration of our veterans. Enjoy military and memorial exhibits, special hotel rates and discounts, kids’ games and more – all around town!

OCTOBER

MUSHROOM COOK-OFF:

Watch as Oregon chefs compete to bring home first place at the annual Mushroom Cook-Off! Enjoy; People’s Choice, Live Cooking Competition, Food Vendors, Mushroom Foraging Tours, Mushroom Identification and more! At the Culinary Center in Lincoln City.

FALL KITE FESTIVAL:

The annual Fall Kite Festival, is held in October at the D River Wayside. This event features professional kite fliers from all over the world. Experts and novices alike fly hundreds of colorful and uniquely shaped kites, from fierce dragons to enormous cuddly bears. The festival offers a kite-making workshop, demonstrations, and “beach food.” Admission is free. Motor coach drop off available, handicap accessible, public restrooms.. This event brings professional kite flyers from all over the world.

FINDERS KEEPERS:

Each year Lincoln City celebrates its history of collecting Japanese glass fishing floats with Finders Keepers: from mid-October to Memorial Day, more than 2000 handcrafted glass floats are placed on Lincoln City beaches for lucky beachcombers to find and keep. 1000 glass sand dollars and crabs will be placed sporadically on special occasions throughout the year as well. Check our Calendar of Events for specific dates.

NOVEMBER

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH:

Native American Heritage Month started at the turn of the (20th) century as an effort to gain a day of recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a whole month being designated for that purpose.

LINCOLN CITY CHOWDER COOK-OFF:

The comfort food of the Oregon Coast, prepared by some of the best chefs in the state, is yours for the tasting at the Chowder Cook-Off . Chefs from throughout the region will compete to take home one of two titles: Best Clam Chowder and Best Signature Seafood Dish. The live competition, held at the Tanger Outlet Center, also includes the activities, food, culture of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians.

DAY TRIPS

Newport: Go south to Newport on Highway 101 to visit the Oregon Coast Aquarium and its newest exhibits, along with many other marine birds, mammals and fish. It takes about 30-35 minutes to get there. For more information, hours of operation and admission price visit: www.aquarium.org

Nearby is the Hatfield Marine Science Center. Built in 1965, the Marine Science Center acquaints visitors with marine species, marine research, and the coastal environment. Oregon Sea Grant manages this unique facility, which provides a valuable link between the public and the exciting world of marine research. The Marine Science Center is one of a handful of centers nationwide that teach, share research, and inform the public about our coastal and marine habitats. Donations only. No formal admission charge.

Marine Discovery Tours offers narrated ocean and bay cruises, including whale watching, with naturalist guides from docks along the Historic Bayfront District in Newport Oregon. The boat DISCOVERY is equipped with the latest audio-visual aids, including a big screen television for viewing microscopic marine life, satellite locator maps, and nature videos. Inside and outside seating insure comfort no matter what the weather. For more information, hours of operation and admission price visit www.anchorpier.com or call 800-903-BOAT

Along the Historic Bay Front are the Undersea Gardens, Ripley’s Believe It Or Not and the Wax Works Museum. For more information, hours of operation and admission price visit
www.marinersquare.com

Make it a day for lighthouses at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area (visitors’ center, lighthouse, nature and tide pool walk) and in Yaquina Bay. After visiting the ghost in the Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, drive east to the Coast Guard Station to see rescue craft. For more information about the two lighthouses in Newport visit: www.yaquinalights.org

McMinnville: Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum, located in McMinnville, OR, less than an hour east of Lincoln City. The facility is home to the Hughes Flying Boat Spruce Goose and more than fifty other historic aircraft 503-434-4180 • www.sprucegoose.org. The Museum is open daily, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s Day, and Easter. Please allow 5 hours to see the entire destination (Aviation Museum, Space Museum, IMAX). See the website for admission fees. Tours: Museum Docents provide guided tours daily at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Groups must be booked 2 weeks in advance, scheduled with the Group Sales Dept. and must be 15 or more people to qualify for group rates. To Book Groups, call 503-434-4068.

Pacific City: About 45 minutes north of Lincoln City on Hwy 101, Pacific City offers the experience of dory fishing, a century old tradition of fishing on a flat-bottomed boat for salmon, halibut, albacore and other bottom fish. Prices vary greatly depending upon the excursion choice and the fish sought. Call Haystack Fishing at 866-965-7555 or Eagle Charters at 877-892-DORY.

Tillamook: About 1 1/4-hour north of Lincoln City on Hwy 101 Tillamook is home to the Tillamook Cheese Factory, owned and operated by local dairy farmers. See cheese being made and packaged in the short self-guided tour. Don’t forget to try the famous Tillamook ice cream before you leave! For more information, call 503-815-1300 or visit: www.tillamookcheese.com. Open daily 8am-6pm (Labor Day to mid-June) 8am-8pm (mid-June to Labor Day)

On the way back to Lincoln City visit the Tillamook Air Museum, a former blimp construction hangar (the largest wooden structure in the world) that now houses World War II-era and other vintage aircraft. See one of America’s finest collections of over 30 War Birds, including P-38 Lightning, F4U-Corsair, P51-Mustang, PBY Catalina and SBD Dauntless dive-bomber. Climb into a jet simulator! Explore the exhibit hall that features rare historical wartime and aviation artifacts including pieces of the great German airship the Hindenburg and a WWII Luftwaffe flight jacket
The museum is open to the public daily, with the exception of Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve Day, and Christmas Day.

For more information, hours of operation and admission price visit: www.tillamookair.com
Group rates available 2 weeks in advance of visit. Please call 503-842-1130 for more information.